FAQ

November 2, 2017

Is it possible to visit someone at an immigration detention center in Japan?

Immigration detention centers are not prisons but they are facilities designed around the careful monitoring of individuals who have broken Japanese immigration laws.  As such, there are strict rules about visiting someone who is currently being held at a detention facility.  Each facility has a different set of rules but the general policies are similar.  To meet a detainee you should bring proper identification, such as a foreign residence card or passport, and visit the detention center during the center’s office hours.  The Osaka detention center is open from 9 to 12 and 1 to 4 on weekdays, although these […]
November 6, 2017

How can parties reduce claims of bias during international arbitration?

Arbitrations are designed to be a fair and unbiased method to settle disputes without resulting to the judicial system.  However, for some parties, the location of the arbitration still presents a potential for bias.  In cases where the parties wish to ensure that the arbitration is as fair as possible, holding the arbitration in a neutral 3rd country may help ease the worry that the arbitrator might be biased.
November 8, 2017

Do couples meet during divorce mediation in Japan?

A couple scheduled for divorce mediation will be given a time to report to their local family court.  Since the couple will enter mediation separately, usually the times for them to arrive will be staggered, so one spouse arrives after the other spouse has already started mediation.  This reduces the likelihood that the couple will run into each other in the family court lobby or hallway.
November 10, 2017

How does the Japanese government collect debts?

When someone owes a tax burden in Japan, the government will first issue a series of warning letters.  If the debtor ignores these letters and continues to neglect payment, the tax authorities will issue another warning letter stating that, if payment is not made, they will forcibly collect the debt through compulsory execution. At this point, if the debtor still does not pay, the government can claim his or her assets in Japan through compulsory execution.  These assets can include bank accounts or real property in Japan.