June 6, 2016

What happens after someone is detained by an immigration officer in Japan?

A Japanese immigration control officer can temporarily detain a foreign national if he or she reasonably believes that the foreign national has committed a deportable offence such as overstaying a visa or committing a crime.  However, this temporary detention is only allowed in situations that require urgent action and once the foreigner has been safely detained, the immigration officer must deliver the foreigner and any evidence relating to the offense to an immigration inspector within 48 hours from the start of the detention.
May 20, 2016

Does marrying a Japanese citizen automatically grant the spouse Japanese citizenship?

Simply marrying a Japanese citizen does not automatically grant Japanese citizenship to a foreign national.  Attaining Japanese citizenship must be done though the normal naturalization process.  While the naturalization process is somewhat easier for spouses of Japanese citizens, the naturalization application is quite time consuming and detailed.  In addition, there may be a waiting period of several years before the spouse can apply, depending on the circumstances.
May 18, 2016

If my visa application is denied, can I reapply again immediately?

When a visa application is denied in Japan, it means that there was some critical flaw in the application or that the applicant did not meet all the requirements for obtaining a visa.  Therefore, reapplying immediately without making any corrections or changes to the application will likely result in another denial.   Rather than immediately resubmit the same application, it is much more productive to review the denied application and attempt to fix any problems or weaknesses before resubmitting.
April 27, 2016

Is there a faster way to get permanent residency in Japan?

In 2012, the Ministry of Justice, Immigration Bureau introduced a new system for certain highly skilled foreigners to obtain Japanese permanent residency.  The new system is a points based system that gives preference for higher levels of education or salary.  Under this system qualified individuals are given preferential immigration treatment such as the ability to obtain permanent residence faster than other foreigners.