FAQ

February 23, 2016

What happens when goods are delivered to an employee who is not authorized to receive them?

In sales contracts, one of the most important parts of the contract is who will accept delivery of the goods. However, many times this is not identified beyond the standard term “Buyer” in the contract. This can result in confusion and mistakes when the seller makes a delivery to a person who is not authorized to accept it.
February 23, 2016

What laws govern contracts in Japan?

Japan does not have a separate code of law for contracts. Instead, contract law is governed by various laws contained in the Civil Code, the law of torts, the law of property, the law of succession and family law. While these codes contain the basic rules governing contract formation and execution in Japan, special rules relating to contracts between merchants are contained in the Commercial Code. Furthermore there are many other laws relating to protection of consumers and regulation of business operators.
February 23, 2016

Can a minor sign a contract without parental permission?

Unmarried persons under the age of 20 are considered minors in Japan. Minors may not enter into contractual relationships without a parent’s (or guardian’s) permission. Therefore, a contract may be rescinded after-the-fact if a court finds that one of the parties was a minor without parental permission. Due to this requirement, idol groups and sports teams must secure the parental permission of their youngest recruits before having them sign an employment contract.
February 23, 2016

Are oral contracts enforceable under Japanese law?

Japanese contract law, like the contract law of many other countries, does not require documentation to formalize a contractual relationship. In other words, contracts can be formed orally, without putting anything in writing, as long as there is a valid “offer” by one party and an “acceptance” by the other. However, while formalized documentation of a contract is not necessary, it can be very difficult to prove the content of a contract in court unless it was put into a writing signed by both parties.