Ohara Law Office

February 24, 2016

How do you apply for a work visa to work in Japan?

To apply for a working visa in Japan, a foreign applicant must bring his or her passport, visa application, photograph and Certificate of Eligibility (original plus copy) to their local Japanese consulate or embassy. It is possible to apply for a visa without the Certificate of Eligibility but the documentation required to be produced by the applicant will be much greater and it may take longer for the visa to be approved.
February 24, 2016

What types of visas are required to work or study in Japan?

Many different types of professions are covered by the variety of working visas available in Japan. Most people who visit Japan professionally and need a working visa can find one that fits their specific field of employment. Diplomats, religious missionaries, artists, journalists, entertainers, engineers and many more professions each have their own unique work visa in Japan. These visas usually afford the applicant a 3 year stay in Japan, which can be renewed multiple times.
February 24, 2016

What is a Japanese “working visa?”

A visa is necessary to establish legal status to work in Japan and without one, foreign nationals are generally not permitted to earn income in Japan. However, there is no general “working visa” in Japan; rather the term is a catch all for a variety of different employment based visas. Employment based visas that allow a foreign national to work in Japan are separated into specific categories such as “teacher,” “engineer” or “specialist in humanities.” These specific visas allow their holders to work in Japan but also limit them to the specific fields of employment designated by the visa.
February 24, 2016

Do you have to show a residency card as part of a job interview?

One of the key interests for any government in setting up a visa based immigration program is to limit the number of jobs that foreigners are allowed to occupy, thereby protecting the local workforce as much as possible. To enforce these protectionist policies, many countries, including Japan, require employers to check whether their foreign job applicants have legal status to work before hiring them.