Ohara Law Office

July 3, 2017

Is it possible to sue someone for engagement fraud in Japan?

Breach of a promise to marry can lead to an award of damages in Japan.  Furthermore, similar to some types of commercial contracts, promises to marry do not have to be written down to be enforceable, as long as there is enough evidence to show the existence of the promise.  In many cases for breach of a promise to marry, the promise can be proved through showing that the couple had a traditional engagement ceremony, notified family and friends or purchased rings before the promise was broken.
June 30, 2017

Is it possible to request a copy of foreigner registration records in Japan?

The Ministry of Justice will accept requests for disclosure of alien registration records for foreigners living in Japan.  Having a copy of these records can help foreign nationals clarify the source of their immigration problems or provide evidence in an immigration dispute.  However, these records contain very private information and therefore, the Ministry of Justice takes great care to avoid disclosing them to the wrong person.  The ministry does this by ensuring that only applications for disclosure by certain people will be accepted.
June 28, 2017

What is an Exclusive License Agreement?

The exclusivity of an agreement is an important part of negotiating any business deal and plays a large role in licensing agreements and distributorship agreements.  Making a distributorship agreement exclusive means that only the distributor with the exclusive right may sell the products.  Similarly, an exclusive license means that only the licensee can use the license.  This exclusivity provides a major business advantage, ensuring that the exclusive distributor or licensee will not face any competition from other companies distributing the same product or using the same license.
June 26, 2017

Do Japanese laws protect trade secrets?

When an employee leaves the service of a company, he or she is required by law to keep trade secrets confidential.  Revealing trade secrets, whether for compensation or for free, is illegal and the basis for a lawsuit under Japan’s unfair competition laws.  Companies are subject to the same liability for questioning their own employees about the trade secrets of the employee’s former companies.